DISCUSSIONS SERIES

the-carriers-of-no

The Carriers of No
1991 — Leslie Hall Pinder

“As lawyers we don’t have to take any responsibility to construct a world. We only have to destroy another’s construction. We say no. We are the civilized, comfortable, well-heeled carriers of no. We thrive on it. Other races die.”

The author has given permission for this booklet to be downloaded and photocopied in its full PDF format for FREE distribution. It is not for sale under any circumstances. Contact the publisher if you have any questions.

The Carriers of No After the Lands Claims Trial

 

 

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Every Tool Shapes the Task
1996 – Ursula Franklin

“One does then have to look at another need for knowledge — that knowledge of why things do not get done that seem to be the appropriate, useful, honourable and decent thing to do … the real problem for any community group is to answer the question, what do you do … not about the gathering of knowledge, but rather about questions of structure and power and responsibility.”

Dr. Ursula Franklin, a Quaker and a feminist, is particularly concerned about the social impact of technology as it affects issues of peace and justice. In this speech, she challenges community organizations working for social change to question whether the information highway is a road which will really take them where they want to go.

The author has given permission for this booklet to be downloaded and photocopied in its full PDF format for FREE distribution. It is not for sale under any circumstances. Contact the publisher if you have any questions.

Every Tool Shapes the Task Communities and the Info Highway

 

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Detained at Customs
1995 – Jane Rule

“Whether I were testifying at this trial or not, my name would come up over and over again as that woman whose books are seized at the border, and I have no defence against it. And I bitterly resent the attempt to marginalize, trivialize and even criminalize what I have to say because I happen to be a lesbian, I happen to be a novelist, I happen to have bookstores and publishers who are dedicated to producing my work.”

Novelist Jane Rule’s powerful and moving testimony at the Little Sister’s trial is presented in its entirety.

The author has given permission for this booklet to be downloaded and photocopied in its full PDF format for FREE distribution. It is not for sale under any circumstances. Contact the publisher if you have any questions.

Detained at Customs

 

who-is-equal-1-thumbWho is Equal: The Passage of Nunavut’s First Human Rights Act
2005 – Jack Anawak

“Where did we get the power to give rights and take away rights? When did we decide to set aside our time-honoured values and beliefs about the value and integrity of all people? In other words, what are we doing as members of our society supporting such non-democratic behaviour, judgments and attitude? If anything as leaders, we should be confronting this unacceptable way of thinking, loudly and clearly, and we should be busy re-affirming and protecting the rights of all.”

Jack Anawak, Canada’s former Ambassador for Circumpolar Affairs, gave an impassioned speech in the Nunavut legislature in 2003 arguing against members who wanted to take sexual orientation out of the new act. His speech (which is available in English and Inuktitut in this booklet) helped to precipitate the signing of Nunavut’s first human rights act and in a continued climate of human rights violations, his words continue to resonate.

The author has given permission for this booklet to be downloaded and photocopied in its full PDF format for FREE distribution. It is not for sale under any circumstances. Contact the publisher if you have any questions.

who-is-equal-2-thumbWho is Equal?

Who is Equal? – in Inuktitut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Inside Out
1993 – Theresa Tait – Wee’Hal Lite Wetsuweten Nation; Guun-Bay Yah – House of Fire

5 1/2 x 8 1/2; 14 pp, saddle-stitched chapbook.
ISBN 0-920999-24-7, $3.50

“As Canada attempts to entrench self government into the constitution, aboriginal people within the work force in and outside the justice system will continue to face resistance within the institutions that serve … this is an acknowledgement of those who do the balancing act between two cultures.”

This essay takes a critical look at white bureaucracies that control services to aboriginal people.